Act 4, Scene I

Scene: A Street.

Enter JASPER and Boy.

Jasper.
There, boy, deliver this; but do it well.
Hast thou provided me four lusty fellows,
[Gives a letter.
Able to carry me? and art thou perfect
In all thy business?
Boy.    
Sir, you need not fear;
I have my lesson here, and cannot miss it:
The men are ready for you, and what else
Pertains to this employment.
Jasper.
There, my boy;
Take it, but buy no land.
[Gives money.
Boy.    
Faith, sir 'twere rare
To see so young a purchaser. I fly,
And on my wings carry your destiny.
Jasper.
Go, and be happy! [Exit Boy.]Now, my latest hope,
Forsake me not, but fling thy anchor out,
And let it hold! Stand fixed, thou rolling stone,
Till I enjoy my dearest! Hear me, all
You powers, that rule in men, celestial!
[Exit.
[Wife.    
Go thy ways; thou art as crooked a sprig as ever grew in London. I warrant him, he'll come to some naughty end or other; for his looks say no less: besides, his father (you know, George) is none of the best; you heard him take me up like a flirt-gill, and sing bawdy songs upon me; but, i'faith, if I live, George,——
Citizen.
Let me alone, sweetheart: I have a trick in my head shall lodge him in the Arches for one year, and make him sing peccavi ere I leave him; and yet lie shall never know who hurt him neither.
Wife.    
Do, my good George, do!
Citizen.
What shall we have Ralph do now, boy?
Boy.    
You shall have what you will, sir.
Citizen.
Why, so, sir; go and fetch me him then, and let the Sophy of Persia come and christen him a child.
Boy.    
Believe me, sir, that will not do so well; 'tis stale; it has been had before at the Red Bull.
Wife.    
George, let Ralph travel over great hills, and let him be very weary, and come to the King of Cracovia's house, covered with black velvet; and there let the king's daughter stand in her window, all in beaten gold, combing her golden locks with a comb of ivory; and let her spy Ralph, and fall in love with him, and come down to him, and carry him into her father's house; and then let Ralph talk with her.
Citizen.
Well said, Nell; it shall be so.—Boy, let's ha't done quickly.
Boy.    
Sir, if you will imagine all this to be done already, you shall hear them talk together; but we cannot present a house covered with black velvet, and a lady in beaten gold.
Citizen.
Sir boy, let's ha't as you can, then.
Boy.    
Beside's, it will show ill-favouredly to have a grocer's prentice to court a king's daughter.
Citizen.
Will it so, sir? you are well read in histories! I pray you, what was Sir Dagonet? was not he prentice to a grocer in London? Read the play of “The Four Prentices of London,” where they toss their pikes so. I pray you, fetch him in, sir, fetch him in.
Boy.    
It shall be done.—It is not our fault, gentlemen.
[Exit.
Wife.    
Now we shall see fine doings, I warrant ye, George.]