Act 5, Scene II

Scene: The Prison.

Enter LYGONES and BACURIUS.

Bacurius.
My lord, your authority is good, and I am glad it is so for my consent would never hinder you from seeing your own king: I am a minister, but not a governor of this state. Yonder is your king; I'll leave you.
[Exit.

Enter TIGRANES and SPACONIA.

Lygones.
There he is,
Indeed, and with him my disloyal child.
Tigranes.
I do perceive my fault so much, that yet,
Methinks, thou shouldst not have forgiven me.
Lygones.
Health to your magesty!
Tigranes.
What, good Lygones! welcome!
What business brought thee hither?
Lygones.
Several businesses:
[Gives a paper.
My public business will appear by this;
I have a message to deliver, which,
If it pleases you so to authorise, is
An embassage from the Armenian state
Unto Arbaces for your liberty.
The offer's there set down; please you to read it.
Tigranes.
There is no alteration happen'd since
I came thence?
Lygones.
None, sir; all is as it was.
Tigranes.
And all our friends are well?
[Reads.
Lygones.
All very well.
Spaconia.
Though I have done nothing but what was good,
I dare not see my father: It was fault
Enough not to acquaint him with that good.
Lygones.
Madam, I should have seen you.
Spaconia.
Oh, good sir, forgive me.
Lygones.
Forgive you! why, I am no kin to you, am I?
Spaconia.
Should it be measured by my mean deserts,
Indeed you are not.
Lygones.
Thou couldst prate unhappily
Ere thou couldst go; 'would thou couldst do as well,
And how does your custom hold out here?
Spaconia.
Sir?
Lygones.
Are you in private still, or how?
Spaconia.
What do you mean?
Lygones.
Do you take money? Are you come to sell sin yet?
Perhaps, I can help you to liberal clients: Or has not the king cast you off yet? Oh, thou vile creature, whose best commendation is, that thou art a young whore! I would thy mother had lived to see this; or, rather , that I had died ere I had seen it! Why didst not make me acquainted
When thou wert first resolved to be a whore?
I would have seen thy hot lust satisfied
More privately I would have kept a dancer,
And a whole consort of musicians,
In my own house, only to fiddle thee.
Spaconia.
Sir, I was never whore.
Lygones.
If thou couldst not say so much for thyself thou shouldst be carted.
Tigranes.
Lygones, I have read it, and I like it;
You shall deliver it.
Lygones.
Well, sir, I will:
But I have private business with you.
Tigranes.
Speak; what is't?
Lygones.
How has my age deserved so ill of you,
That you can pick no strumpets i' the land,
But out of my breed?
Tigranes.
Strumpets, good Lygones?
Lygones.
Yes; and I wish to have you know, I scorn
To get a whore for any prince alive:
And yet scorn will not help! Methinks, my daughter
Might have been spared; there were enow besides.
Tigranes.
May I not prosper but she's innocent
As morning light, for me; and, I dare swear,
For all the world.
Lygones.
Why is she with you, then?
Can she wait on you better than your man?
Has she a gift in plucking off your stockings?
Can she make caudles well, or cut your corns?
Why do you keep her with you? For a queen,
I know, you do contemn her; so should I;
And every subject else think much at it.
Tigranes.
Let 'em think much; but 'tis more firm than earth
Thou seest thy queen there.
Lygones.
Then have I made a fair hand: I call'd her whore. If I shall speak now as her father, I cannot choose but greatly rejoice that she shall be a queen: But if I should speak to you as a statesman, she were more fit to be your whore.
Tigranes.
Get you about your business to Arbaces;
Now you talk idly.
Lygones.
Yes, sir, I will go.
And shall she be a queen? She had more wit
Than her old father, when she ran away.
Shall she be queen? Now, by my troth, 'tis fine!
I'll dance out of all measure at her wedding:
Shall I not, sir?
Tigranes.
Yes, marry, shalt thou.
Lygones.
I'll make these wither'd kexes bear my body
Two hours together above ground.
Tigranes.
Nay, go;
My business requires haste.
Lygones.
Good Heav'n preserve you!
You are an excellent king.
Spaconia.
Farewell, good father.
Lygones.
Farewell, sweet virtuous daughter.
I never was so joyful in my life,
That I remember! Shall she be a queen?
Now I perceive a man may weep for joy;
I had thought they had lied that said so.
[Exit Lygones.
Tigranes.
Come, my dear love.
Spaconia.
But you may see another,
May alter that again.
Tigranes.
Urge it no more:
I have made up a new strong constancy,
Not to be shook with eyes. I know I have
The passions of a man; but if I meet
With any subject that should hold my eyes
More firmly than is fit, I'll think of thee,
And run away from it: Let that suffice.
[Exeunt.