Act 2, Scene II

Scene: An open Place before the City. A great Crowd.

Enter three Men and a Woman.

1 Man.
Come, come, run, run, run.
2 Man.
We shall out-go her.
3 Man.
One were better be hang'd than carry women out fiddling to these shows.
Woman.
Is the king hard by?
1 Man.
You heard he with the bottles said, he thought we should come too late. What abundance of people here is!
Woman.
But what had he in those bottles?
3 Man.
I know not.
2 Man.
Why, ink, goodman fool.
3 Man.
Ink, what to do?
1 Man.
Why, the king, look you, will many times call for those bottles, and break his mind to his friends.
Woman.
Let's take our places; we shall have no room else.
2 Man.
The man told us, he would walk o'foot through the people.
3 Man.
Ay, marry, did he.
1 Man.
Our shops are well look'd to now.
2 Man.
'Slife, yonder's my master, I think.
1 Man.
No, tis not he.

Enter PHILIP with two Citizens' Wives.

1 Citizens' Wife.
Lord, how fine the fields be! What sweet living 'tis in the country!
2 Citizens' Wife.
Ay, poor souls, God help 'em, they live as contentedly as one of us.
1 Citizens' Wife.
My husband's cousin would have had me gone into the country last year. Wert thou ever there?
2 Citizens' Wife.
Ay, poor souls, I was amongst 'em once.
1 Citizens' Wife.
And what kind of creatures are they, for love of God?
2 Citizens' Wife.
Very good people, God help 'em.
1 Citizens' Wife.
Wilt thou go with me down this summer, when I am brought to bed ?
2 Citizens' Wife.
Alas, tis no place for us.
1 Citizens' Wife.
Why, pr'ythee?
2 Citizens' Wife.
Why, you can have nothing there; there's nobody cries brooms.
1 Citizens' Wife.
No?
2 Citizens' Wife.
No truly, nor milk.
1 Citizens' Wife.
Nor milk, how do they?
2 Citizens' Wife.
They are fain to milk themselves i' the country.
1 Citizens' Wife.
Good lord! But the people there, I think, will be very dutiful to one of us.
2 Citizens' Wife.
Ay, God knows will they; and yet they do not greatly care for our husbands.
1 Citizens' Wife.
Do they not? alas! i' good faith, I cannot blame them: For we do not greatly care for them ourselves. Philip, I pray, chuse us a place.
Philip.
There's the best, forsooth.
1 Citizens' Wife.
By your leave, good people, a little.
1 Man.
What's the matter?
Philip.
I pray you, my friends do not thrust my mistress so; she's with child.
2 Man.
Let her look to herself then; has she not had thrusting enough yet? If she stay shouldering here, she may hap to go home with a cake in her belly.
3 Man.
How now, goodman Squitter-breech! why do you lean on me?
Philip.
Because I will.
3 Man.
Will you, Sir Sauce-box?
[Strikes him.
1 Citizens' Wife.
Look, if one ha' not struck Philip.—Come hither, Philip; why did he strike thee?
Philip.
For leaning on him.
1 Citizens' Wife.
Why didst thou lean on him?
Philip.
I did not think he would have struck me.
1 Citizens' Wife.
As God save me, la, thou art as wild as a buck; there's no quarrel, but thou art at one end or other on't.
3 Man.
It's at the first end then, for he'll ne'er stay the last.
1 Citizens' Wife.
Well, stripling, I shall meet with you.
3 Man.
When you will.
1 Citizens' Wife.
I'll give a crown to meet with you.
3 Man.
At a bawdy-house.
1 Citizens' Wife.
Ay, you're full of your roguery; but if I do meet you, it shall cost me a fall.

Flourish. Enter one running.

4 Man.
The king, the king, the king, the king! Now, now, now, now!

Flourish. Enter ARBACES, TIGRANES, MARDONIUS, and Soldiers.

All.  
God preserve your majesty!
Arbaces.
I thank you all. Now are my joys at full,
When I behold you safe, my loving subjects.
By you I grow; 'tis your united love
That lifts me to this height.
All the account that I can render you
For all the love you have bestow'd on me,
All your expenses to maintain my war,
Is but a little word: You will imagine
'Tis slender payment; yet 'tis such a word
As is not to be bought without our bloods:
'Tis peace!
All.  
God preserve your majesty!
Arbaces.
Now you may live securely in your towns,
Your children round about you; you may sit
Under your vines, and make the miseries
Of other kingdoms a discourse for vou,
And lend them sorrows. For yourselves, you may
Safely forget there are such things as tears;
And you may all, whose good thoughts I have gain'd.
Hold me unworthy, when I think my life
A sacrifice too great to keep you thus
In such a calm estate!
All.  
God bless your majesty!
Arbaces.
See, all good people, I have brought the man,
Whose very name you fear'd, a captive home.
Behold him; 'tis Tigranes! In your hearts
Sing songs of gladness and deliverance.
1 Citizens' Wife.
Out upon him!
2 Citizens' Wife.
How he looks!
3 Woman.
Hang him, hang him!
Mardonius.
These are sweet people.
Tigranes.
Sir, you do me wrong,
To render me a scorned spectacle
To common people.
Arbaces.
It was far from me
To mean it so. If I have aught deserved,
My loving subjects, let me beg of you
Not to revile this prince, in whom there dwells
All worth, of which the nature of a man
Is capable; valour beyond compare:
The terror of his name has stretch'd itself
Wherever there is sun: And yet for you
I fought with him single, and won him too.
I made his valour stoop, and brought that name,
Soar'd to so unbelieved a height, to fall
Beneath mine. This inspired with all your loves.
I did perform; and will, for your content,
Be ever ready for a greater work.
All.  
The Lord bless your majesty!
Tigranes.
So, he has made me
Amends now with a speech in commendation
Of himself; I would not be so vain-glorious.
Arbaces.
If there be anything in which I may
Do good to any creature here speak out;
For I must leave you: And it troubles me,
That my occasions, for the good of you,
Are such as call me from you: Else, my joy
Would be to spend my days amongst you all.
You show your loves in these large multitudes
That come to meet me. I will pray for you.
Heaven prosper you, that you may know old years,
And live to see your children's children
Sit at your boards with plenty! When there is
A want of anything, let it be known
To me, and I will be a father to you.
God keep you all!
[Flourish. Exeunt Kings and their Train.
All.  
God bless your majesty, God bless your majesty!
1 Man.
Come, shall we go? all's done.
Woman.
Ay, for God's sake: I have not made a fire yet.
2 Man.
Away, away! all's done.
3 Man.
Content. Farewell, Philip.
1 Citizens' Wife.
Away, you halter-sack, vou!
2 Man.
Philip will not fight; he's afraid on's face.
Philip.
Ay, marry; am I afraid of my face?
3 Man.
Thou wouldst be Philip, if thou saw'st it in a glass: it looks so like a visor.
[Exeunt the three Men and Woman.
1 Citizens' Wife.
You'll be hang'd, sirrah. Come Philip, walk before us homewards. Did not his majesty say he had brought us home peas for all our money?
2 Citizens' Wife.
Yes marry, did he.
1 Citizens' Wife.
They're the first I heard on this year, by my troth. I long'd for some of 'em. Did he not say, we should have some?
2 Citizens' Wife.
Yes, and so we shall anon, I warrant you, have every one a peck brought home to our houses.
[Exeunt.