Act 5, Scene III

Scene: Another Street

Enter Mercer, Pandar, and FRANCISSINA.

Mercer.
Have I spoke thus much in the honour of learning, learned the names of the seven liberal sciences, before my marriage; and, since, have in haste written epistles congratulatory to the nine muses, and is she proved a whore and a beggar?
Pandar.
'Tis true. You are not now to be taught that no man can be learned of a sudden; let not your first project discourage you: what you have lost in this, you may get again in alchymy.
Francissina.
Fear not, husband; I hope to make as good a wife as the best of your neighbours have, and as honest.
Mercer.
I will go home. Good sir, do not publish this; as long as it runs amongst ourselves, 'tis good honest mirth. You'll come home to supper? I mean to have all her friends, and mine, as ill as it goes.
Pandar.
Do wisely, sir, and bid your own friends; your whole wealth will scarce feast all hers; neither is it for your credit to walk the streets with a woman so noted: get you home, and provide her clothes; let her come an hour hence with a hand-basket, and shift herself, she'll serve to sit at the upper end of the table, and drink to your customers.
Mercer.
Art is just, and will make me amends.
Pandar.
No doubt, sir.
Mercer.
The chief note of a scholar, you say, is to govern his passions; wherefore I do take all patiently: In sign of which, my most dear wife, I do kiss thee. Make haste home after me; I shall be in my study.
[Exit.
Pandar.
Go, avaunt!—My new city-dame, send me what you promised me for consideration, and may'st thou prove a lady!
Francissina.
Thou shalt have it; his silks shall fly for it.
[Exeunt.