Act 2, Scene III

Scene: Another Room in the same.

Enter ROSALURA and ORIANA.

Rosalura.
Ne'er vex yourself, nor grieve; you are a fool then.
Oriana.
I am sure I am made so: Yet, before I suffer
Thus like a girl, and give him leave to triumph——
Rosalura.
You say right; for as long as he perceives you
Sink under his proud scornings, he'll laugh at you:
For me, secure yourself; and for my sister,
I partly know her mind too: Howsoever,
To obey my father, we have made a tender
Of our poor beauties to the travell'd monsieur,
Yet two words to a bargain! He slights us
As skittish things, and we shun him as curious.
May be, my free behaviour turns his stomach,
And makes him seem to doubt a loose opinion:
I must be so sometimes, though all the world saw it.
Oriana.
Why should not you? Are not minds only measured?
As long as here you stand secure—
Rosalura.
You say true;
As long as mine own conscience makes no question,
What care I for report? that woman's miserable,
That's good or bad for their tongue's sake. Come, let's retire,
And get my veil, wench; by my troth, your sorrow,
And the consideration of men's humorous maddings,
Have put me into a serious contemplation.

Enter MIRABEL and BELLEUR, and stand apart.

Oriana.
Come, 'faith, let's sit and think.
Rosalura.
That's all my business.
Mirabel.
Why stand'st thou peeping here? Thou great slug, forward!
Belleur.
She is there; peace!
Mirabel.
Why stand'st thou here then,
Sneaking, and peaking, as thou wouldst steal linen?
Hast thou not place and time?
Belleur.
I had a rare speech
Studied, and almost ready; and your violence
Has beat it out of my brains.
Mirabel.
Hang your rare speeches!
Go me on like a man.
Belleur.
Let me set my beard up.
How has Pinac perform'd?
Mirabel.
He has won already:
He stands not thrumming of caps thus.
Belleur.
Lord, what should I ail!
What a cold I have over my stomach; 'would I had some hum!
Certain I have a great mind to be at her,
A mighty mind.
Mirabel.
On, fool!
Belleur.
Good words, I beseech you;
For I will not be abused by both.
Mirabel.
Adieu, then
(I will not trouble you; I see you are valiant),
And work your own way.
Belleur.
Hist, hist! I will be ruled;
I will, i' faith; I will go presently:
Will you forsake me now, and leave me i' th' suds?
You know, I am false-hearted this way; I beseech you,
Good sweet Mirabel (I'll cut your throat if you leave me,
Indeed I will!) sweet-heart!
Mirabel.
I will be ready,
Still at thine elbow; take a man's heart to thee,
And speak thy mind; the plainer still the better.
She is a woman of that free behaviour,
Indeed, that common courtesy, she cannot deny thee:
Go bravely on.
Belleur.
Madam—keep close about me.
Still at my back.—Madam, sweet madam—
Rosalura.
Ha!
What noise is that? what saucy sound to trouble me?
Mirabel.
What said she?
Belleur.
I am saucy.
Mirabel.
'Tis the better.
Belleur.
She comes; must I be saucy still?
Mirabel.
More saucy.
Rosalura.
Still troubled with these vanities? Heaven bless us!
What are we born to?—Would you speak with any of my people?
Go in, sir; I am busy.
Belleur.
This is not she, sure:
Is this two children at a birth? I'll be hang'd then
Mine was a merry gentlewoman, talk'd daintily,
Talk'd of those matters that befitted women;
This is a parcel-prayer-book; I'm served sweetly!
And now I am to look too; I was prepared for th' other way.
Rosalura.
Do you know that man?
Oriana.
Sure, I have seen him, lady.
Rosalura.
Methinks 'tis pity such a lusty fellow
Should wander up and down, and want employment.
Belleur.
She takes me for a rogue!—you may do well, madam,
To stay this wanderer, and set him at work, forsooth;
He can do something that may please your ladyship;
I have heard of women that desire good breedings,
Two at a birth, or so.
Rosalura.
The fellow's impudent.
Oriana.
Sure, he is crazed.
Rosalura.
I have heard of men too that have had good manners;
Sure, this is want of grace; Indeed, 'tis great pity
The young man has been bred so ill; but this lewd age
Is full of such examples.
Belleur.
I am founder'd,
And some shall rue the setting of me on!
Mirabel.
Ha! so bookish, lady? is it possible?
Turn'd holy at the heart too? I'll be hang'd then.
Why, this is such a feat, such an activity.
Such fast and loose——

Enter Servant, with a veil.

Such fast and loose—— A veil too for your knavery?
O Dio, Dio!

Rosalura.
What do you take me for, sir?
Mirabel.
An hypocrite, a wanton, a dissembler,
Howe'er you seem, and thus you are to be handled;
(Mark me, Belleur) and this you love, I know it.
Rosalura.
Stand off, bold sir!
Mirabel.
You wear good clothes to this end,
Jewels; love feasts, and masques.
Rosalura.
Ye are monstrous saucy!
Mirabel.
All this to draw on fools; and thus, thus, lady,
[Takes hold of her.
Ye are to be lull'd.
Belleur.
Let her alone, I'll swinge ye else,
I will, i' faith! for though I cannot skill o' this matter
Myself, I will not see another do it before me,
And do it worse.
Rosalura.
Away! you are a vain thing!
You have travell'd far, sir, to return again
A windy and poor bladder! You talk of women,
That are not worth the favour of a common one,
The grace of her grew in an hospital!
Against a thousand such blown fooleries,
I am able to maintain good women's honours,
Their freedoms, and their fames, and I will do it-
Mirabel.
She has almost struck me dumb too.
Rosalura.
And declaim
Against your base malicious tongues, your noises,
For they are nothing else. You teach behaviours?
Or touch us for our freedoms? Teach yourselves manners,
Truth and sobriety, and live so clearly
That our lives may shine in ye; and then task us.
It seems, ye are hot; the suburbs will supply ye:
Good women scorn such gamesters; so I'll leave ye!
I am sorry to see this: 'Faith, sir, live fairly.
[Exit.
Mirabel.
This woman, if she hold on, may be virtuous;
'Tis almost possible: We'll have a new day.
Belleur.
Ye brought me on, ye forced me to this foolery;
I am shamed, I am scorn'd, I am flurted! yes, I am so!
Though I cannot talk to a woman like your worship,
And use my phrases, and my learned figures,
Yet I can fight with any man.
Mirabel.
Fy!
Belleur.
I can, sir;
And I will fight.
Mirabel.
With whom?
Belleur.
With you; with any man;
For all men now will laugh at me.
Mirabel.
Pr'thee be moderate.
Belleur.
And I'll beat all men. Come!
Mirabel.
I love thee dearly.
Belleur.
I will beat all that love; love has undone me!
Never tell me! I will not be a history.
Mirabel.
Thou art not.
Belleur.
'Sfoot, I will not! Give me room,
And let me see the proudest of ye jeer me;
And I'll begin with you first.
Mirabel.
Pr'ythee, Belleur!
If I do not satisfy thee——
Belleur.
Well, look you do.
But, now I think on't better, tis impossible!
I must beat somebody; I am maul'd myself.
And I ought in justice——
Mirabel.
No, no, no, ye are cozen'd:
But walk, and let me talk to thee.
Belleur.
Talk wisely,
And see that no man laugh, upon no occasion;
For I shall think then 'tis at me.
Mirabel.
I warrant thee.
Belleur.
Nor no more talk of this.
Mirabel.
Dost think I am maddish?
Belleur.
I must needs fight yet; for I find it concerns me:
A pox on't: I must fight,
Mirabel.
I' faith, thou shalt not.
[Exeunt.